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Topic: My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks... (Read 1230 times) previous topic - next topic

My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks...
So after several weeks of printing with the 101hero here is my conclusion:

  • The 101hero seems for me a good and cheap starting point if someone wants get a little experience with 3D printing (modeling, slicing, printing) itself, but it's that, what is written on the box: a toy.
  • It is not easy to set up correct for unexperienced/non-technicians/children. Without a LCD/encoder (which can be connected to the SD-Card connnector!) it is very hard in case of trouble to do a diagnosis.
  • The 101hero is perfect for making little children happy printing little figures, but very unsatisfactory for their dads if they want to print replacement parts or housings.
  • The printing can be optimized by using a cooling fan, blowing cool air over the printer bed, using a filament stand with ball bearings and using feed rates <=10mm/s. To have good printer and filament parameters (feed rate, retraction, nozzle temperature) and to use a good quality filament and do a good calibration of the printer bed is essential.
  • The accuracy, linearity and angularity of the cartesian axis are not very good. Maybe thats an effect of the delta kinematics. Straight edges are bumpy, diameters are bigger or smaller than in the model.
  • I am sure, that there is a lot of potential to overcome these things with modifications....with some money.......hmmm maybe better spent in a better printer.
  • Beside those things i am very disappointed about the behaviour and policy of the creators of 101hero. The communication with the inverstors is really worse, they don't react on comments on KS and requests via mail, they don't offer spare parts and one of the most disappointing things: they are using open source software in their commercial product (Marlin V1 controller firmware) and don't offer their modified sources , neither on request. That's not fair. They couldn't offer their product for such a low price if they had to write the controller firmware themselves.
  • So think i will put the 101hero 3D printer toy back in the box and offer it at ebay and will spend 300 bucks to get a 3D printer tool.

  • rfray
  • [*][*]
Re: My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks...
Reply #1
So after several weeks of printing with the 101hero here is my conclusion:

  • The 101hero seems for me a good and cheap starting point if someone wants get a little experience with 3D printing (modeling, slicing, printing) itself, but it's that, what is written on the box: a toy.
  • It is not easy to set up correct for unexperienced/non-technicians/children. Without a LCD/encoder (which can be connected to the SD-Card connnector!) it is very hard in case of trouble to do a diagnosis.
  • The 101hero is perfect for making little children happy printing little figures, but very unsatisfactory for their dads if they want to print replacement parts or housings.
  • The printing can be optimized by using a cooling fan, blowing cool air over the printer bed, using a filament stand with ball bearings and using feed rates <=10mm/s. To have good printer and filament parameters (feed rate, retraction, nozzle temperature) and to use a good quality filament and do a good calibration of the printer bed is essential.
  • The accuracy, linearity and angularity of the cartesian axis are not very good. Maybe thats an effect of the delta kinematics. Straight edges are bumpy, diameters are bigger or smaller than in the model.
  • I am sure, that there is a lot of potential to overcome these things with modifications....with some money.......hmmm maybe better spent in a better printer.
  • Beside those things i am very disappointed about the behaviour and policy of the creators of 101hero. The communication with the inverstors is really worse, they don't react on comments on KS and requests via mail, they don't offer spare parts and one of the most disappointing things: they are using open source software in their commercial product (Marlin V1 controller firmware) and don't offer their modified sources , neither on request. That's not fair. They couldn't offer their product for such a low price if they had to write the controller firmware themselves.
  • So think i will put the 101hero 3D printer toy back in the box and offer it at ebay and will spend 300 bucks to get a 3D printer tool.

Agree.  Ran it about 10 hours yesterday on various things like trinkets for the grandkids, but on an item that was to be useful to me, spent 6 hours printing one object.  The first I didn't notice the filament had kinked (I don't have any filament reel yet for loose filament) and it wound up causing it to print nothing in the air above a lower section.  It also looked like shifted after printing an 1/8" solid section, and them going to some thin walls on the perimeter.  A second print got near complete but missing another link and had to stop it.  I'm printing a filament reel but will rake me probable 20+ hours over several days just to print out the pieces.  Printing small things I've modeled with OpenSCAD have had mixed success on the detail.  For that I'm guessing a better printer is needed.

I printed a small tool that holds 1/4" screwdriver bits that came out pretty nice looking but was tight on the tolerances where the bit fits in.  After an hour or filing, I still can't get it all the way in.

It's definitely been good to learn things like using Cura, and Repetier to slice and control/monitor the printer, learn a little about gcode, etc.  I will probably do the same as you after I do some mods to get the hero better wrapped up  - filament reel, attach the control box to one tower, tidy up the cables, then write up a little on the basics of how to take something from Thingiverse, slice it with Cura, import it using Repetier and off you go.  Anything else will be on the buyer.  I will probably jump up to the $500-800 next to get something I can actually make useful things on with the resolution needed.

  • BobC
  • [*][*]
Re: My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks...
Reply #2
I didn't notice the filament had kinked (I don't have any filament reel yet for loose filament)
Same problem here.  I found a paint roller served as a fantastic emergency spool holder.  So good, in fact, that I'm going to print a couple small bits to make it more stable, and stay with it until I get my next printer (which includes a spool holder).

  • Chaloux
  • [*]
Re: My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks...
Reply #3
Thanks for your insights. Helped me a lot to make the final decision.

  • BobC
  • [*][*]
Re: My conlusion of the 101hero after several weeks...
Reply #4
  • It is not easy to set up correct for unexperienced/non-technicians/children. Without a LCD/encoder (which can be connected to the SD-Card connnector!) it is very hard in case of trouble to do a diagnosis.
I think the key is developing a consistent system for problem detection, correction and prevention.

Whenever I change the filament or modify the print settings, or simply haven't used the printer for a while, I always print a Temperature Calibration Tower (done today because all my prints went bad - it was due to lower room temperature):
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1298948

Whenever I change anything that affects the printer mechanically, such as the printer configuration or a motor replacement (today!), I always print a Speed Calibration Tower:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1381839

I recommend installing OpenSCAD and modifying the .scad files directly, then generating the STL.  The Thingiverse Customizer is badly broken and takes way too long when it does work.  But do take a quick peek at each tower in the Customizer to learn about the model parameters.

Each model comes with a Python script to modify the Speed or Temperature with Height.  These scripts were easiest for me to install in Cura 15, though I use Cura 3 for everything else.

To keep things as fast as possible, both towers are printed in vase-mode, with a single wall, 2-layer base, and no top or fill.  Be sure to print the Temperature Tower at a slow speed, 6-8 mm/sec, so the hot-end has time to reach the new temperature before too many layers are printed. (I keep meaning to try using the "Pause at Z" script for this, but I haven't yet looked into it.)

Start the Speed Tower at something like 8 mm/sec, and increase by steps of 1 mm/sec.  A step height of 8 mm gives enough steps to cover the entire useful range.

Before starting the print, be sure to always set the speed and temperature as appropriate for the first step of each tower.

There are other things I should mention about the towers, but they aren't coming to mind at the moment.  Please let me know if you have problems with them.

Quote
  • The accuracy, linearity and angularity of the cartesian axis are not very good. Maybe thats an effect of the delta kinematics. Straight edges are bumpy, diameters are bigger or smaller than in the model.
The 101Hero has too many sources of vibration and wobble.  But they can be managed!

A big part of the problem is the crappy stock motors.  The gearing can start sloppy with lots of grinding, and only gets worse from there.  High-quality replacement motors are recommended!  After the motor replacement I did today, my Speed Calibration Tower shows my useful draft printing speed has gone up to 17 mm/sec!  (Clean/fine prints still need 8-10 mm/sec.)

Another factor is that the entire printer frame is unstable.  It can get canted just by removing a print, and can wobble during a print.  I added acrylic sheets between each column to serve both as stiffening and as an enclosure.  But even this doesn't fix things well enough.  When I start a print, I always use at least a skirt (or brim or raft) so I can nudge/twist the printer legs until the lines look right.  If the print starts before it looks right, I abort, clean the bed, then restart.

The ball joints also have lots of slop and the arms are too flexible, both of which can cause print distortion. My solution is to add snug (not loose or tight) rubber bands at each end of the arms (NOT in the middle!).  Made a HUGE improvement for me!

Then there's the spool: The spool holder must fill the entire center of the spool and have very smooth rotation, else the tugs of rotation will cause the print carriage to be pulled and jerked around.  The best (and cheapest!) solution is to use a paint roller (described in another of my posts somewhere on this forum).

Finally, the firmware needs an update, especially the internal configuration constants, and particularly the arm lengths.  I've been meaning to look at this, but it will take a ton of time to get done, so it hasn't been a priority.

FWIW, I find glue stick works best for bed adhesion.  Tape is too fussy, hair spray is too messy.
  • Last Edit: 22 Nov, 2017, 07:17:24 AM by BobC